Posts in Temperature Protection

TOP 5 COLD CHAIN DRIVERS FOR 2020

August 2nd, 2019 Posted by Food & Beverage, Temperature Protection, Update 0 thoughts on “TOP 5 COLD CHAIN DRIVERS FOR 2020”

The Cold Chain transportation experts at QProducts & Services present the Top 5 Cold Chain Drivers for 2020.

Enter 2020 armed with knowledge that can help you strategically plan your cold chain operations. From cannabis disruption to wild weather, there are many things going on socially, logistically, and environmentally to be aware of. These insights are from speakers at the annual Cold Chain Council, and our internal experts at QProducts & Services.

 

QProducts & Services extends their gratitude to the many industry experts that spoke at the June Cold Chain Council for the Food & Beverage Industries. Together, they educated attendees on how to best leverage these drivers in anticipation of 2020.

Check Out the Top 5 Cold Chain Drivers for 2020 Below:

 

 

 

QProducts & Services is a manufacturer of passive temperature protection and cargo security solutions for the global supply chain. For over 25 years, they have developed innovative, cost-saving solutions for transporting temperature sensitive commodities. QProducts & Services has expanded their product line to include cargo security solutions and wireless temperature monitoring technologies. Manufactured just outside of Chicago, IL, their patented products are noted for durability, performance and reliability in protecting the integrity of shippers’ cargo throughout the supply chain.

Summer Shipping Mistakes to Avoid: Advice from a Temperature-Control Expert

July 10th, 2019 Posted by Temperature Protection, Update 0 thoughts on “Summer Shipping Mistakes to Avoid: Advice from a Temperature-Control Expert”

Though spring and early summer have been cold and wet throughout most of the country, warmer temperatures and sunnier days are on the way. With them comes some unique impacts from summer shipping. To get more insight on potential pitfalls, Coyote asked our very own Kevin Lynch, Director of Sales at QProducts & Services, to share some potential pitfalls. Kevin has over 17 years of experience in temperature-controlled shipping. Below is his advice.

 

Balancing Cost and Product Integrity

As every shipper knows, ensuring that product arrives to the customer in good condition is extremely important, but adequately protecting cargo comes at a cost. Every summer, shippers across the country grapple with a few questions:

 

  • How vulnerable is my product to the heat of the summer?
  • How much will it cost for me to implement additional temperature-control best practices?
  • Does that cost outweigh the risk of damaged and rejected product?

 

The answers will vary based on a slew of factors—there is no single solution. As you analyze your own supply chain, it’s important to consider the full spectrum of consequences that occur as a result of damaged product. Using these as a guide, you can do a cost/benefit analysis to build a temperature-controlled solution that’s right for your business.

 

 

Costly consequences of rejected loads, consisting of: disposal requirement, unhappy customer, expedited replenishment, lost revenue, insurance claims, and negative brand exposure.

Three Common Summer Shipping Mistakes

Once you’ve set your temperature-control strategy, it’s important to keep your eye on a few potential pitfalls as you implement your plans. Here are three common mistakes Kevin sees shippers make.

 

 

Mistake #1:

Waiting until you need temperature-controlled capacity to secure it.

There are a lot of products that can usually ship in a dry van, but require temperature-control on a seasonal basis (i.e. organic snacks, pharmaceuticals, chocolate, beverages, etc.). In the summer, this typically means converting to refrigerated trailers.

The great debate for shippers is when to make the conversion. Refrigerated capacity will almost always cost more than standard dry shipping—this is especially true in the summer when reefer demand spikes with produce and other seasonal summer products. Yet damaged and refused product can be very costly. How can you keep your seasonal budget in-line while balancing cargo security?

Shipping temperature sensitive products in hot summer weather.
Best Practices:

Preparation is key.

If you ship cargo that can’t withstand a 90°F heatwave, you need to plan well before the thermometer rises. By working ahead, you can mitigate cost inflation and avoid service disruptions. Proactively reach out to your refrigerated carriers and 3PLs with forecasted needs at the beginning of the season to establish rates and service requirements.

Analyze your supply chain and look for gaps in the “cold chain” where your product is vulnerable.

Optimize your routing guide and prioritize reliable carriers. A higher rate with higher tender acceptance is still cheaper than a carrier that sends you into the spot market for a last-minute option.

Explore refrigerated alternatives, such as insulated thermal blankets. Conducting a cost-benefit analysis can open up new capacity options during the summer months.

Monitor the forecast in your shipping lanes and confirm capacity once when you see a heatwave on the horizon.

 

Mistake #2:

Assuming your LTL carrier has temperature-controlled cross docking facility.

If you ship LTL, your shipment will typically make several stops within the carrier’s terminal network throughout transit. As your product is unloaded and reloaded, it may spend several hours on the dock, waiting to be transferred. This is manageable most of the year, but during heatwaves ambient temperature inside terminals can reach nearly 90 degrees, potentially putting your goods at risk.

Best Practices:

Ask your LTL providers about the temperature conditions at their terminals.

Collaborate with them to put a plan in place to protect your shipments from temperature excursions. Verify routing patterns, temperature requirements and product sensitivity.

If shipping refrigerated LTL, consider insulated thermal blankets to protect product temperature while on the dock.

 

Mistake #3:

Assuming the refrigeration unit will always be running.

Refrigerated trailers and containers are very reliable, but they aren’t completely infallible. Operator error, equipment failure and long delays are all potential risks to product integrity.

Operator Error: Though the vast majority of carriers comply to shipper requirements, some drivers may occasionally turn off the refrigeration unit to conserve fuel, then turn it back on before making delivery.

Equipment Failure: This is less of a concern with over-the-road shipping, as the driver has close oversight of the load and can quickly refuel or address any malfunctioning equipment. However, when shipping refrigerated ocean or intermodal, there is far less individual attention to each container, and if the unit runs out of fuel or stops working, there is much less of a chance that the carrier will resolve the issue.

Delays: Regardless of mode or lane, delays in transit are bound to happen—especially with cross-border and/or multimodal shipping. The longer the product is held up, the higher the chance that the unit will run out of fuel. The hotter the temperature, the more fuel the unit consumes and the faster the product will heat up once it runs out.

Best Practices:
  • Clearly define temperature requirements on your Bill of Lading (BOL).
  • Work with trusted providers who will follow your requirements exactly.
  • Proactively communicate product requirements with all providers involved.
  • Request an electronic log of trailer temperatures for the entire trip.
  • Include your own temperature recording device in the payload.

 

 

More Options, Less Risk

Though managing temperature-sensitive freight is never easy, there have never been more resources available to shippers: widespread tracking technology, sophisticated analytical tools, and lower-cost cargo protection equipment all empower supply chain professionals to increase shipment visibility and reduce costs.

Work with providers that take cargo integrity seriously. Talk to your supply chain providers about what solutions and services they can offer to help maintain the integrity of your products from origin to destination. By leveraging all available solutions, you can manage risk and cost simultaneously.

 

About Kevin Lynch: As Director of Sales at QProducts, Kevin Lynch leverages over 17 years of supply chain experience to design and implement temperature protection and cargo security solutions for shippers in all industries.

 

About QProducts & Services: QProducts & Services is a manufacturer of passive temperature protection and cargo security solutions for the global supply chain. For over 25 years, they have developed innovative, cost-saving solutions for transporting temperature sensitive commodities. QProducts & Services has expanded their product line to include cargo security solutions and wireless temperature monitoring technologies. Manufactured just outside of Chicago, IL, their patented products are noted for durability, performance and reliability in protecting the integrity of shippers’ cargo throughout the supply chain.

Protect from Freeze During This Weekend’s Storm

January 18th, 2019 Posted by Intermodal, Over the Road, Temperature Protection 0 thoughts on “Protect from Freeze During This Weekend’s Storm”

This weekend is the beginning of a multi-week cold front sweeping across the Midwest and Northeastern USA. Between today and January 31st, temperatures will reach 10-15°F lower than normal winter lows and will cause high-impact icing on major lanes. By understanding this new weather pattern, you can decrease freeze risk this weekend and in the future.

According to the Riskpulse® Chief Meteorologist, Jon Davis, this weekend’s snow storm will have a “major impact—likely the kind we will be talking about for years to come.”

Screen Shot 2019-01-16 at 4.20.04 PM

The storm will begin today (Friday) and will continue until Monday. Its power will intensify as it crosses the country from West to East. The Northeastern region will experience the most impact with snow totaling 8-10 inches in major cities like Boston and New York. In addition to the snowfall, an Arctic Cold will move in behind the storm causing high winds and icing. By Monday, the storm is expected to subside.

 

The impact of the storm includes high-impact icing events through the East Coast, starting near Harrisonburg and moving north toward Eastern Massachusetts. With a half-inch of ice, lane closures are to be expected over the weekend. Roads will likely begin to reopen between Monday and Tuesday as the storm impact wears off.

Northeastern Lanes Impacted

Most lane closures are expected to occur during the day Sunday into early-Monday.

Snow

I-90: 511 high risk miles
I-95: 415 high risk miles
I-81: 365 high risk miles
I-80: 302 high risk miles

Ice

I-95: 286 high risk miles
I-81: 249 high risk miles
I-80 80 high risk miles
I-90: 67 high risk miles

Midwest Region

After this weekend’s storm, another is expected to move through the Midwest/Great Lakes region on Tuesday, January 22. The metro areas of Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit and Buffalo will be the most impacted by snow, Artic Cold and the Lake Effect. Periodic conditions of heavy snowfall are expected through February.

This weekend’s ice storm strength will compare to these top 8 Northeast US Ice Storms.

How to Avoid Freeze

While rerouting shipments in response to these weather conditions is encouraged, a more proactive approach is recommended for long-lasting operational efficiency. A proactive strategy includes two key elements: (1) Identification of high-risk events at least one week before they occur and (2) the ability to decrease overall risk-level of products on live shipments.

 

(1) Identify High-Risk Events

Artificial Intelligence software has made the cold chain smarter and safer than ever. Now, high-risk weather events can be forecasted up to 14 days in advance with Sunrise by Riskpulse. The technology assesses the impact on specific lanes and, due to the severity of risk, assigns a “Risk Score” to that lane. Equipped with quantitative data, your team can respond to storms (like the one this weekend) up to two weeks prior.

 

(2) Decrease the Threat

Unfortunately, damage to perishable commodities can occur at any point along the route, even with AI software like Sunrise. Some of the most common temperature excursions are due to reefer power outages, waiting at terminals, and cross-docking—all are periods where active temperature control is not turned “on”. By utilizing passive temperature protection, such as thermal container liners or insulated pallet covers, overall risk is decreased during transition periods. In fact, our proprietary CargoQuilt® provides freeze protection for CRT and 2-8°C commodities in extreme conditions, including this 2-8°C air freight pharmaceutical shipment.

Home of Thermal Shipping Products, Insulated Shipping Containers, Pallet Wraps, Thermal Blankets, Insulated Foil & More!
Passive Temperature Protection products, like thermal blankets, insulated pallet covers, and container liners, can protect from freeze. QProducts & Services has a portfolio including dozens cold chain products customized for over 140 lane-specific scenarios.

Freaking Out?

If you’re scrambling to protect shipments during this multi-week cold front, we recommend speaking with Riskpulse to receive your lane-specific risk score. When your results come back, you’ll be equipped with accurate data to make operational decisions. In the case your lanes are deemed high-risk, passive thermal protection can keep your temperature sensitive commodities in spec (CRT/ Ambient and 2-8°C) for extended periods of time—even when shipping dry.

 

Get this winter’s full weather report by listening to the entire Riskpulse webinar Winter Storm and Article Cold Update here.

Cargo Containers in an ocean port

Making the Switch from Air to Ocean

September 18th, 2018 Posted by Air, Pharmaceutical & Life Sciences, Temperature Protection, Transportation 0 thoughts on “Making the Switch from Air to Ocean”

Value of Thermal Blankets Verified as an Integral Part of the Transition from Air to Ocean

TFormance on Pallet

TFormance™ has arrived- A high tech new insulation from QPS!

December 14th, 2017 Posted by Temperature Protection 0 thoughts on “TFormance™ has arrived- A high tech new insulation from QPS!”

CargoQuilt® protects from both heat and cold, as well as other environmental hazards.

CargoQuilt® Wraps Up Additional Savings For Shippers

August 28th, 2017 Posted by Food & Beverage, Over the Road, Temperature Protection 0 thoughts on “CargoQuilt® Wraps Up Additional Savings For Shippers”

As published in Food Logistics Magazine: http://www.foodlogistics.com/article/11598291/cargoquilt-wraps-up-additional-savings-for-shippers

ARTICLE AUG 27, 2014

Kevin Lynch, National Account Manager at Q Products & Services’ (QPS), a manufacturer of insulated blankets, confirms that capacity issues in the trucking sector, particularly for OTRrefrigerated, are extremely tight.

“Our customers and prospects both are telling us when it comes to capacity for OTR refrigerated, it’s just not there,” he says. To make matters worse, most OTR refrigerated carriers do not have immediate plans to invest in new equipment to add capacity either, says Lynch.

QPS manufactures passive temperature protection products, including the Multi-Trip CargoQuilt, the flagship product in their quilt fleet, which covers an entire or partial load of freight enclosed in a trailer or container, for either domestic or international shipments. The CargoQuilt protects against freezing, heat and condensation damage.

While it is a relatively simple product, its ability to save money for shippers who covert their OTR refrigerated shipments to intermodal dry shipments is impressive. Furthermore, it gives shippers added flexibility by allowing them to use temperature-controlled equipment only when they really need it.

“It’s a win-win for shippers, because not only is there capacity on intermodal, but it’s a more cost effective compared to OTR,” says Lynch. Once shippers begin using the insulated blankets and understand how well they perform, they start looking elsewhere in their supply chain for opportunities to use insulated blankets, Lynch adds.

Logistics Podcast

Podcast: Staying Relevant, Staying Innovative in the Food/Bev Supply Chain

June 6th, 2017 Posted by Food & Beverage, Temperature Protection 0 thoughts on “Podcast: Staying Relevant, Staying Innovative in the Food/Bev Supply Chain”

Our Director of Sales for our Food and Beverage market, Kevin Lynch, joined the panel of this webinar by Food Logistics on staying relevant in the supply chain. Listen Here!

“How do companies stay relevant and innovative in today’s supply chain? Kevin Lynch, director of food and beverage at Q Products & Services, talks about those issues and how strategic partnerships and collaboration play a critical role in staying on the leading edge, which ultimately supports customers’ initiatives and business goals.”

A Little About Us

At QProducts & Services, we manufacture passive temperature protection products and cargo security solutions. We design and engineer cost-saving solutions for transporting temperature-sensitive commodities like thermal container blankets, pallet covers, ULD pallet quilts, drum/tote covers, insulated bags, and even electronic cargo locks.

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If you're searching for thermal shipping, insulated shipping containers, pallet wraps, thermal blankets, insulated foil, banana blankets, tote covers, drum covers, thermal blankets, shipping blankets, electronic cargo locks, or ice cream bags, you found all that and a whole lot more. We are fully committed to providing a passive thermal solution from top to bottom, nose to rear, of your temperature sensitive cargo.

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